Tag Archives: Florida

Volunteer Spotlight: Debbie DeLucco & Donna Adair

PBC Parks’ ‘Volunteer Spotlight’ highlights our talented and dedicated volunteers! Meet DuBois Pioneer Home volunteers, Debbie DeLucco and Donna Adair, two of the “original” Dubois Pioneer Home historical docents. Watch the video to learn about the dedicated volunteers – including what they enjoy most about being docents!

Docents provide guests with quality, educational, and enriching experiences by giving educational tours throughout the DuBois House exhibit. Consider becoming a docent at the DuBois House located at DuBois Park in Jupiter! Call PBC Parks Volunteer Services at 561-966-6609 for more information.

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The Palm Beach County Parks and Recreation Department, recognized nationally for excellence in park and recreation management, operates more than 110 parks and recreational facilities and provides organized recreational programs and services for people of all ages and abilities. Visit http://www.pbcparks.com for more information.

PBC Ocean Rescue Scores Historic First Place Win at USLA Regionals

The 2018 United States Lifesaving Association Southeast Regional Championships were held at Flagler Beach on July 26th and 27th. This competition was attended by 22 beach patrols from the Southeast Region with some of the best open water athletes in the nation.

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Palm Beach County Ocean Rescue was supported by 16 competitors who volunteered their time and resources to represent the County and included: Lieutenant Chase Robertson, Kim Robertson, Jessica Ventura, Lead Guard Tiffany Lacasse-Johnson, Lieutenant Phil Harris, Chase Harris, Matt Lynskey, Tracey Matuszko, Lieutenant Dan Barnickel, Russ Gehweiler, Jessie Stevens, Training Officer Steve Kaes, Kira Shoemaker, Mitchell Irwin, Hanna Forrest and Lex May.

This first place win was an important victory for the Palm Beach County Parks and Recreation Department’s Ocean Rescue team (PBCOR). PBCOR is one of the largest beach patrols in the Southeast Region and strives to attract and retain full-time lifeguards of the highest caliber. Competing and placing first in a USLA Regional Competition helps attract top guards from around the nation to make their careers at Palm Beach County.

USLA Competitions are one of the only organized sports that directly promotes life saving. In winning the first place Southeast Regional title, PBCOR competitors did a fantastic job promoting and representing their public safety agency. In addition to their required training on duty, many of the guards trained hard off duty to win this event.

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Chase Robertson, Matt Lynskey

The competition consists of 10 individual events that include: surf swim, paddleboard, surf ski, singles surf boat, beach flags, iron guard, ironman/woman, American ironman/woman, run swim run, and 2K beach. There are six team events: doubles surf boat and paddleboard rescueand 4X100 run relay, line pull rescue, surf rescue, and taplin relay.


Highlights:

  • Lieutenant Chase Robertson was the highest overall point scorer for Palm Beach County and the second highest male point scorer for the entire competition with a total of 89.5 points. He competed and placed in 12 events and won first place in 9 events.
  • Jessica Ventura was the highest overall female point scorer for Palm Beach County with a total of 64 points and competed in a total of 18 events placing first in age group surf swim, board race, surf ski, international iron woman, run swim paddle and run swim run.
  • Tiffany Lacasse-Johnson was the second highest overall female point scorer for Palm Beach County with a total point score of 60.7 from a total of 20 events.
  • Senior Guard Lieutenant Phil Harris returned this year to compete in seven events. Highlights were winning first place in the age group run-swim-run, and 2nd place in surf swim, board race, 2k beach run, and beach flags. His daughter, Chase Harris, who swam for FIU and recently graduated proudly competed alongside her dad finishing 6th in the highly competitive open women’s swim.
  • Senior Guard and Training Officer Steve Kaes was there to compete and his guidance and help were invaluable to all the competitors before, during and after the event. For years he captained the Competition Team and our success this year was accomplished on the foundation Steve Kaes and other senior guards have built over the years.

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About the Palm Beach County Parks and Recreation Department

The Palm Beach County Parks and Recreation Department operates more than 110 parks and recreational facilities and is committed to making the quality of life for Palm Beach County residents and visitors better by providing diverse, safe and affordable recreation services, welcoming parks, and enriching social and cultural experiences by promoting wellness, fostering environmental stewardship, contributing economic value, and by improving the community every day for this and future generations. For more information about recreational opportunities and healthy, happy living, visit www.pbcparks.com and follow @pbcparks on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and WordPress.

Remember to swim near a lifeguard when you visit the beach. For more information, visit USLA.org.

What’s that Plant? Pickerelweed!

A native Florida plant that typically grows along the shore, the purple-flowered Pickerelweed can be found in a number of #pbcParks. Watch this short video to learn some fun facts about the plant, including ways it helps the environment!

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About Palm Beach County Parks and Recreation Department:
The Palm Beach County Parks and Recreation Department operates more than 110 parks and recreational facilities and is committed to making the quality of life for Palm Beach County residents and visitors better by providing diverse, safe and affordable recreation services, welcoming parks, and enriching social and cultural experiences by promoting wellness, fostering environmental stewardship, contributing economic value, and by improving the community every day for this and future generations. For more information about recreational opportunities and healthy, happy living, visit http://www.pbcparks.com and follow @pbcparks on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and WordPress.

#pbcParks Builds Communities

The Palm Beach County Parks and Recreation Department offers countless opportunities to create and maintain bonds that help communities thrive and unite for good causes. In our more than 80 parks and recreation facilities, friendships are sparked through simple, every day encounters that bring together neighbors and communities. Regardless of age, gender, or ability, playtime is for everyone – so come explore, achieve and recharge in a PBC Park in or near your community!

The Office of Public Engagement created this 60-second public service announcement to portray the many community-building opportunities patrons have by visiting PBC Parks. The video includes original artwork and animation created by intern Carlos Duenas, Jr. with a voice over by Public Relations Specialist Bibi Baksh.

We make the quality of life for Palm Beach County residents and visitors better by providing diverse, safe and affordable recreation services, welcoming parks, and enriching social and cultural experiences. We achieve this by promoting wellness, fostering environmental stewardship, contributing economic value, and by improving our community every day for this and future generations.

For more opportunities for healthy, happy living, visit pbcParks.com.

Accomplish Your Fitness Goals with #pbcParks

The number one New Year’s Resolution is to get healthy & fit – #pbcParks is here to help!

There are so many free & low-cost ways to stay active in our parks, from doing strength training exercises in our free Fitness Zone, to cardio like biking and swimming, there are endless options to help you accomplish your fitness goals in our more than 80 parks and recreation facilities throughout Palm Beach County.

Join Bibi and #pbcParks in this short video as she shows you some of the ways you can get a great workout in our parks.

We make the quality of life for Palm Beach County residents and visitors better by providing diverse, safe and affordable recreation services, welcoming parks, and enriching social and cultural experiences. We achieve this by promoting wellness, fostering environmental stewardship, contributing economic value, and by improving our community every day for this and future generations.

For more opportunities for healthy, happy living, visit pbcParks.com.

Keep America Beautiful Grant, Lowe’s Help Plant Trees at County Pines Recreational Complex

Thanks to a $10,000 Lowe’s and Keep America Beautiful grant, County Pines Recreational Complex at Samuel Friedland Park now has new trees and mulch! The trees were planted in November, and mulch was spread by six Lowe’s Volunteers on November 30.

The trees will give shade to a playground that will be installed in the area in the future.

For more about this wonderful volunteer project, watch this short video:

The mission of the Palm Beach County Parks and Recreation Department is to make the quality of life for Palm Beach County residents and visitors better by providing diverse, safe and affordable recreation services, welcoming parks, and enriching social and cultural experiences. We achieve this by promoting wellness, fostering environmental stewardship, contributing economic value, and by improving our community every day for this and future generations. Visit pbcParks.com for more information.

Limestone Creek Community Celebrates Florida Historic Marker

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Members of the Limestone Creek community unveil the Florida State Historic Marker.

On Saturday, April 30, more than a century after the first “Jupiter Colored School” was opened in the Limestone Creek Community, residents, officials, volunteers and others gathered inside Palm Beach County’s Limestone Creek Park to celebrate the installation of a marker that commemorates the community’s vast history.

“For too long, way too many people didn’t have access to good education, and this was especially true in the south,” said U.S. Congressman Patrick Murphy, who was present at the event, along with Palm Beach County Vice Mayor Hal Valeche, former L.M. Davis Elementary School teacher Mrs. Dorothy Bendross Walker, and other iconic figures from around the community.

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Congressman Patrick Murphy speaks to the crowd at the unveiling ceremony.

The ceremony centered on the strides in education in the Limestone Creek Community, the oldest African American community in the North Palm Beach area, in the past century. Denied access to Jupiter’s public schools by the laws of segregation, the community opened a school of their own in 1905. The first “Jupiter Colored School” was located in the local African Methodist Episcopal Church.

“This was a community that had nothing, but they made sure their children got a decent school, good teachers,” remarked Jamie Stuve, the CEO & President of the Loxahatchee River Historical Society, an organization that helps preserve “history shaped by nature” of the Loxahatchee River region.

When the 1928 hurricane destroyed the church, community member L.M. Davis donated an acre of his homestead for the construction of a new school. The community pooled their limited resources and even built a school bus for their children. Matching funds from the Rosenwald Fund, created by Julius Rosenwald, president of Sears, Roebuck and Co, enabled the community to construct a two-room school with a kitchen, and to hire two teachers for grades 1 through 8.

Mrs. Walker, a life-long member of the community who attended the Elementary School and eventually taught there, told a story of the many struggles the students and teachers faced at the school during the mid-20th century. “It was a different time, a different place when we were here, we had no electricity, no running water, no heat, no air conditioning… but we survived,” she said.

The graduating class of 1941 raised funds to construct a sidewalk over the drainage ditch at the entrance to the school and, along with their principal, autographed the remaining concrete. In 1956, the school was renamed the L.M. Davis Elementary School in honor of the man who donated the land and drove the school bus. High school students were transported 20 miles south to attend Industrial High in Riviera Beach LimestoneCreekHistoricMarkerUnveiling (4)until Jupiter public schools began to be desegregated in 1967.

“The Palm Beach County Parks and Recreation Department is steadfast in preserving our history, but more than just preserving it, we need to interpret it and teach it,” said Eric Call, the Director of the Palm Beach County Parks and Recreation Department.

Limestone Creek Park is operated by the Palm Beach County Parks and Recreation Department. The department operates more than 80 regional, district, community, beach, and neighborhood parks, spanning several thousand acres. Visit pbcParks.com to learn about opportunities for healthy, happy living.

View photos on Flickr

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